News and Tribune

April 4, 2013

Jeffersonville shelter director resigns

Mayor says he’s sad to see Sarah Green depart

By BRADEN LAMMERS
braden.lammers@newsandtribune.com

JEFFERSONVILLE — J.B. Ogle Animal Shelter Director Sarah Green offered her resignation to city officials Tuesday. It will be effective May 1.

It is the second time Green has offered a resignation to the city. She previously submitted a letter of resignation this past winter as a result of the long hours she was working, she told the News and Tribune at the time. 

She said she was spending too much time away from her family, but agreed to stay in her role as animal shelter director because the city council agreed to add two part-time workers to the animal shelter’s staff to help ease the workload.

Green could not be contacted by the News and Tribune on Wednesday and messages left on her voicemail were not returned as of press time.

Jeffersonville’s City Council and Mayor Mike Moore have lauded Green’s work as shelter director.

“I’m extremely sad about that,” Moore said of her resignation. “Sarah’s without a doubt one of the most valuable employees the city of Jeffersonville has.”

No replacement has been named for Green and the city has posted the position, said City Attorney Les Merkley. Moore added that several candidates have been identified and “[Green’s] recommendation is going to carry a lot of weight with who takes that job.” 

Green took over the role of shelter director when Moore’s administration took office in 2011, and her tenure has seen its share of ups and downs.

The city and the Clark County Commissioners had an ongoing public disagreement about money owed to the shelter. Issues of who owed what to whom lingered, as the shelter did not receive the county’s share of expenses owed from 2010-12. 

Jeffersonville operates the shelter and collects animals throughout the county, and in return the other Clark County municipalities and the county make payments to the shelter based on population.

The county was responsible for paying $66,500 each year to the city for taking animals to the shelter. However, the city had also failed to pay for space leased in the basement of the Clark County Government Building.

A deadline of March 4 was placed on the two sides to reach an agreement or the city threatened to stop accepting the county’s animals. A settlement was reached March 1. The county agreed to pay Jeffersonville $150,000 for the animal shelter to bring payments up to date through 2013. Jeffersonville officials added that they are hopeful a new interlocal agreement with all of the area municipalities will be in place by 2014.

In addition to recovering funding owed to the shelter, Green and the shelter announced in August that it had entered into a partnership with No Kill Louisville, a nonprofit organization, with the intention of making the shelter a no-kill facility by August 2013.

That partnership was severed last month after disagreements on how to implement the no-kill policies. A requirement in the contract was that Jeffersonville must provide 60 days notice of the termination of the partnership, which is scheduled to officially terminate May 19.  

Despite ending the partnership three months early, Green said at the time that the shelter still planned on working toward the goal of being a no-kill shelter. She said J.B. Ogle Animal Shelter is already meeting the no-kill standards for dogs — where euthanasia is at 10 percent or less at the facility — and the shelter will be working to meet the standard for adoptable cats. 

Moore said the city still plans to work toward the goals outlined by Green.

“The plans and procedures Sarah put in place we will continue for years to come,” he said.

 

ANOTHER CITY RESIGNATION

The city’s Public Safety Director Mike Ogg has also offered his resignation to the city this week because of a move.

No replacement has been named for either post, but the city is seeking candidates for the positions.