News and Tribune

May 1, 2013

THEIR VIEW: Opinions from other newspapers for May 1


The lessons of organ donation

 

The range of emotion surrounding life-saving transplantation of a vital organ is extreme. It is the ultimate “good news-bad news” scenario.

First, there is the bad news. Someone, somewhere, has lost his or her life. Tragedy and heartache are overwhelming for the immediate survivors. In the midst of indescribable sorrow, a life-changing decision is made. Although a treasured loved one has slipped away, an organ, perhaps more than one, is donated to an anonymous recipient. The only thing known is that someone, somewhere will live a better, longer life because of this precious gift. Perhaps this knowledge will bring a shred of comfort to the survivors amid their sorrow.

And then, there is the good news. An anxious, gravely ill patient who has been hoping a long time for the opportunity to become healthy again suddenly gets her wish. The agonizing wait is over, and the promise of a better life takes hold.

Today, the “good news” has a name. It’s Katelyn Newell, a Terre Haute second-grader who has been hospitalized since early January. The 8-year-old Deming Elementary student was born with a heart defect, but previous surgeries were unable to correct the problem. A heart transplant was her only remaining option.

On Wednesday, Katelyn got her new heart, and her new life. She is recovering from transplant surgery at Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health in Indianapolis. With her mother constantly by her side since she was hospitalized, they dreamed about this day. All the while, they knew the joy of a life-saving transplant would be the result of another family’s sorrow.

The Wabash Valley community can share in both the joy and sorrow of this inspiring story. While feeling great relief and happiness that young Katelyn now has a fighting chance to rejoin her Deming classmates and live a more normal life, we can all temper our enthusiasm for the outcome with the understanding that an anonymous family and an unknown community are mourning a terrific loss. We join their grieving and offer prayers of sympathy and comfort.

The lessons of organ donation are like that.

Now, we urge others to apply those lessons. There cannot be a better time for individuals and families to talk about pledging themselves to becoming organ donors should circumstances arise. Make your intentions known. Put them in writing. Be prepared. Doing so may someday even save a life.

—  Tribune-Star, Terre Haute. April 26, 2013.

 

‘Largest’ tax cut a victory for Pence but will it actually help Hoosiers?

 

So, are you excited Gov. Mike Pence and the Indiana General Assembly has passed a 5 percent cut in your state income tax? Good for you if you are.

But don’t spend it all in one place.

Its legislative supporters hope this political morsel will be gobbled up by Hoosier voters.

“Hey, they cut our taxes!”

And indeed they did. Let’s do the math.

Indiana’s current income tax rate of 3.4 percent will be cut to 3.3 percent in 2015 and then to 3.23 percent in 2017. The tax burden on Hoosiers this year would be $340 on each $10,000 of taxable income. In 2015, that will drop to $330 (a cut of $10-per-$10,000). Finally, in 2017, it will settle at $323 ($17-per-$10,000).

For those with a family income of, say, $50,000, the savings two years from now will be $50, or 96 cents a week. The more well off who make $150,000 will save $150, or $2.88 a week.

The complete impact would come two years later, when the same $50,000 family income would be cut by $87 and the $150,000 family would retain $255 in lower taxes.

The impact for the first family will be $1.67 a week (about the same as a “tall” coffee at Starbucks, which is that company’s name for a small), and for the other family $4.90 a week (two cups of coffee, or a coffee and a muffin).

For those who like averages, the “average” Hoosier would realize $114 in annual tax savings, or $2.19 a week.

It’s a symbolic gesture, meant to show the governor and lawmakers are on Hoosiers’ side by throwing them a few bucks that could have totaled something of significance if channeled to programs designed to improve education, help senior citizens or shore up the safety net for people living in poverty.

“Today Hoosier taxpayers won a great victory. The agreement reached between our administration and legislative leaders will be the largest state tax cut in Indiana history,” Pence said after legislators agreed on this action.

It’s a political victory for Pence, one even the Republican-dominated Legislature found difficult to stomach. The governor wanted a 10 percent tax cut (twice as symbolic?) but legislative leaders from his own party thought for a long while it would be better to continue to capture the $520 million in tax money for the state budget. The agreement cut that amount in half.

The governor deserves an A for effort and persistence. He campaigned on cutting income taxes, and he kept his promise.

He’s maintained it can be done without harming any programs operated by state government.

Now we’ll find out, with the means to grab an extra coffee or soft drink a week.

— The Herald-Times, Bloomington