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March 20, 2013

How safe is your pet in the car?

Most people don't restrain their pets while traveling, but experts say they should

(Continued)

Pet restraints

While not everyone is going to buy a new car just to increase their pet's safety and comfort, manufacturers offer a number of pet restraints.

A popular choice for dogs is a harness that snaps into your car's seatbelt latch. There are many different styles and brands but they all generally work the same.

According to BarkBuckleUp, a company that sells restraining harnesses, at a speed of just 35 miles per hour, a 60-pound unrestrained dog can cause an impact of 2,700 pounds, slamming into a car seat, windshield, or passenger. The company says 98 percent of dogs are not properly restrained in a moving vehicle.

Strong reservations

But the Center for Pet Safety has voiced strong reservations about these harness restraints. In a pilot study it said it found a 100 percent failure rate among all the harness devices tested. None, it says, was deemed safe enough to protect both the dog and the humans in the event of an accident.

The organization refused to reveal the brands of the harnesses tested, saying it didn't want to discourage companies from creating products to protect animals. They just want the products to be better.

“Our primary concern is not to attack individual manufacturers for selling well-intentioned products,” the group said in a statement. “If we share brands at this early stage in our work, we shift the focus away from what is truly needed: measurable, safe standards that manufacturers can follow for the benefit of consumers.”

Until then there may be things pet owners can do to make their animals safer. Nearly every expert agrees that driving with your pet on your lap is a serious safety issue. Besides being a distraction, it can make it harder for a driver to respond to road emergencies.

A pet barrier might be a way to make your pet safer while traveling. Available in a variety of sizes for wagons, minivans, or SUVs, a barrier gives your pet some room to move, but keeps them safely contained behind the rear seat and off the upholstery.

Story provided by ConsumerAffairs.

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