News and Tribune

Floyd County

November 25, 2012

New Albany signs help make a better first impression

Keep New Albany Clean and Green installs three entrance signs

NEW ALBANY —  Most of the gateways to New Albany are now a little more inviting, as three entrance signs were installed this month near the Interstate 265 interchanges along State Street, Grant Line Road and Charlestown Road.

The nonprofit organization Keep New Albany Clean and Green raised private funds to foot the purchase of the signs, which cost about $4,800 each. Soon the organization will also pay for landscaping improvements around the signs, which is estimated to cost about $1,200 per location.

The recent installations means Keep New Albany Clean and Green has now placed five wayfaring signs near entrances to the city over the past year. The organization also paid for signs to be installed near the downtown Interstate 64 interchanges.

Keep New Albany Clean and Green also offered to install a sign at the sixth main entrance to the city off Spring Street near the Clark County line. However, the city elected to handle refurbishing that entrance on its own, though a plan for the gateway has yet to be introduced.

Replacing old and worn down signs helps present a community in a favorable light when people enter the city, Keep New Albany Clean and Green President Irv Stumler said. The organization’s volunteers will help ensure the new signs and surrounding landscaping remain in order, he continued.

“You don’t want to just put up signs and not maintain them,” Stumler said. “We want to create a sense of pride for the residents and for people coming into the area.” 

Though not an official wing of the city, the organization has approached the public sector on several occasions to request better code enforcement and also to propose different beautification projects.

Keep New Albany Clean and Green has installed planters downtown, and also hosted a city cleanup day earlier this month. Since launching in 2010, Stumler said the organization’s mission has truly been to maintain and improve the aesthetic appeal of the city.

“There’s other things we want to do to help improve the appearance of various areas of town including upgrading some buildings that haven’t been properly maintained and trying to convince the city leaders to do their part in code enforcement,” he said.

“There’s a lot of codes there now that should be enforced that are somewhat, but not as strongly as they should be.”

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