News and Tribune

Floyd County

November 16, 2013

PANEL: Local economic outlook better than state

National politics may dictate continued growth

NEW ALBANY — Nationally, it’s the status quo. Locally, the economic forecast is a little rosier.

Indiana University Southeast and the Kelley School of Business hosted its annual economic outlook breakfast Friday morning to provide local business leaders and politicians a peek at the expectations of the national, state and regional economy for next year.

Panelists said implications for economics on the local and national stage are tied to national politics.

Among the concerns were the direction of the Federal Reserve, issues surrounding the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, Medicare, as well as continued partisan politics and future fights over a national budget and debt ceiling.

Willard Witte, retired Indiana University economics professor, started with an overview of the national economy by letting the audience know if they attended the event last year, they were free to check their emails for the next few minutes.

“I really don’t have a lot that’s new to say,” Witte said in jest.

He said while there has been growth in the national economy, it has been slightly behind expectations. During the past three years, the national economy has grown at about a 2 percent rate.

The lackluster growth during the past few years has been explained by the economy coming out of the recession, an international economy that was keeping growth limited, the national stimulus plan ending and uncertainty due to political dysfunction.

“We really can’t see the economy doing much better than the status quo — 2 percent growth or so that we have been experiencing for the last three year — until sometime at least until the middle of next year,” Witte said.

There also has been a steady decrease in unemployment, but the figures were not without their caveats. Witte explained that while the unemployment rate continues to decrease, the employment rate — the number of people older than 16 years old that are employed — has not grown since the recession hit in 2008.

“The employment rate right now is as low as it’s been since 1983,” he said. “And on the unemployment side, a lot of the reason that unemployment has been falling is because the number of people have been participating in the labor market has been declining significantly.

“People have been dropping out of the labor force.”

Five years removed from the financial crisis and with international economies improving slightly, they are not as much of a factor on the national level, Witte explained. But he added that political dysfunction is likely to continue to have an affect on the national economy moving forward.

A temporarily resolution was reached to end a government shutdown last month, as well as a temporary raise in the federal debt limit, both of which will need to be revisited in January.

Witte said his larger concern stems with the direction that will be taken by the Federal Reserve, and it’s potential new chair Janet Yellen.

Dubos Masson, an associate professor of finance at the Kelley School of Business, said any time the federal reserve mentions tapering back on how much money it is printing, the stock market drops.

But contrary to slow overall growth numbers, Masson said the market has outgained expert’s predictions during the past few years. Masson said he is not sure if that trend will continue, but does expect growth in the stock market, just maybe at a slower pace.

Masson said the bigger concern on the national stage is not the Affordable Care Act, but Medicare because of the large market of aging baby boomers that will be falling into the program and how the federal government will address its needs.

“The economy looks like it is going for smoother waters, we hope,” Masson said. “Unemployment is still a stubborn reminder ... full recovery, full employment is going to take some time.

“And I don’t know if we’ll ever get back to the kind of full employment we had prior to the crisis.”

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Floyd County
LOCAL MAGAZINES
Easter 2014 photos


Click on any photo to purchase it.

SPECIAL CONTENT
Twitter Updates
Follow us on twitter
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
AP Video
Judge Ponders Overturning Colo. Gay Marriage Ban Airlines Halt Travel to Israel Amid Violence NYPD Chief Calls for 'use of Force' Retraining VA Nominee McDonald Goes Before Congress Bush: Don't Worry, Sugarland Isn't Breaking Up US Official: Most Migrant Children to Be Removed Police Probing Brooklyn Bridge Flag Switch CDC Head Concerned About a Post-antibiotic Era Raw: First Lady Says `Drink Up' More Water Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law Holder Urges Bipartisanship on Immigration Raw: Truck, Train Crash Leads to Fireball US Airlines Cancel Israel Flights Obama Signs Workforce Training Law Crash Victims' Remains Reach Ukraine-held City Diplomatic Push Intensifies to End War in Gaza Cat Fans Lap Up Feline Film Festival Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die Veteran Creates Job During High Unemployment
2013 Photos of the year


Take a look at our most memorable photos from 2013.