News and Tribune

Letters

October 17, 2012

NEWS AND TRIBUNE LETTERS — For Oct.17

(Continued)

Choosing party or faith

Many Catholics traditionally vote Democratic. You may remember that when Obamacare was being debated, there were 10 pro-life Democrats, mostly Catholic and led by Bart Stupak of Michigan, who spoke out against the plan because of their belief that it called for government-funded abortions.

After much discussion and promises from the president, they caved. Interestingly, Stupak didn’t seek re-election and eight of the other nine were defeated. It’s hard to be a pro-life Democrat when the Democratic Party is so strongly and adamantly pro-abortion.

In December 2010, the National Catholic Register ran an article listing the pro-life voting records of the Catholic members of the Senate and the House. The percentages they used were compiled by National Right to Life. At that time, there were 20 Catholic senators, six Republican and 14 Democrat. The Republicans had an average pro-life voting record of 80.8 percent. The Democrats had an average pro-life rating of 7.6 percent.

In the House, there were 96 Catholics, 34 Republican and 62 Democrats. The Republicans had an average pro-life rating of 96.9 percent. The Democrats had an average pro-life of 18 percent.

What this all seems to show is that Catholic Democrat politicians tend to take their Democratic Party allegiance much more seriously than they do their Catholic faith. This also seems to hold true for a lot of Catholic voters.

However, the good news is that studies tend to show that Catholics who are more serious about their faith, those who attend Mass regularly and receive the sacraments, tend to vote for the pro-life candidate rather than by party affiliation.

— Tom Powers, Corydon

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Letters