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September 6, 2013

Blood analyst disputes Camm’s murder defense

(Continued)

LEBANON — LYING ADMITTED

Under defense questioning, Neal admitted that he and Gibson had lied when they told Camm that investigators had found blood on his jacket, that information conflicted as to when Camm left the church basketball game and that witnesses had seen Camm wearing the gray sweatshirt found under his son’s body.

DNA linked the sweatshirt to Boney almost three years after Camm’s first conviction. Such lies, Neal testified, are considered an acceptable strategy to “get at the truth” when interrogating a prime suspect.

“There was a high probability he [Camm] was going to be arrested,” Neal said.

But Camm’s attorneys argue that the case against him relies solely on the spatter theory — coming not with Dean Marks, but from an administrator who they claim misrepresented his training and expertise — crime scene reconstructionist Robert Stites.

“That’s why you got up in the middle of that interrogation, to go consult with him,” attorney Stacey Uliana told Neal.

“He [Stites] said 90-95 percent [sure],” Neal responded.

“You said, that’s not good enough, I need 100 percent,” Uliana said.

“At some point, he informed us he was 100 percent certain,” Neal answered.

Neal told jurors he was unaware that the Camm murders were Stites’ first homicide case, that Stites hadn’t been trained in blood-spatter analysis, nor that Stites never had testified in a criminal case.

“And you never were told that spatter analysis is more subjective than science?” Uliana asked.

“No,” Neal responded.

When jurors questioned, Neal told them he didn’t know who determined that Camm’s wife and children likely were killed at 9:30 p.m., after Camm says he left the church basketball game, nor who revised the time of deaths to 7:30 p.m., shortly after Kim Camm and the children would have arrived home from Bradley’s swim practice. Neal also explained investigators may not check out a suspect’s alibi thoroughly before arresting him or her.

“Usually you do,” said Neal. “But sometimes the evidence overrides that.”

Today’s testimony will begin with defense questions for Marks.

— This article was produced as a partnership between the News and Tribune and WAVE 3 News.

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