News and Tribune

January 31, 2013

Meth lab found in New Albany home

Taser used to take man into custody

By GARY POPP
gary.popp@newsandtribune.com

NEW ALBANY — A New Albany man was arrested after an active methamphetamine lab was found in his home.

Doug R. Henderson, 27, of 3943 Douglas Ave., attempted to flee from New Albany police officers, who had gone to his home Jan. 25 to serve an outstanding warrant on charges out of Clark County.

New Albany police reported that after officers arrived at Henderson’s home, one of the officers went to the rear of the residence and immediately smelled an odor commonly associated with an active methamphetamine lab.

The officer then peered through the rear windows to see if any people were in the home.

Henderson is reported to have then fled through the front door of the residence in the direction of a second officer.

The officer in front of the home identified himself as a police officer and commanded Henderson to stop. Henderson refused and began to flee on foot, police reported.

Henderson was quickly taken to the ground by the officer, but a struggle ensued, and the officer from the rear of the home approached and deployed a Taser into Henderson’s back.

Police noted Henderson then became compliant and was placed into custody.

Officers then noticed smoke coming from the home, as well as two dogs running loose in the residence.

One of the officers entered the home and saw an active methamphetamine lab in plain sight on the floor next to a bed.

According to the report, the lab consisted of a two-liter bottle containing a sludge-like substance, coffee filters, aluminum foil, glass jars topped with coffee filters, ammonium nitrate, paint thinner, Drain-O, a heat-plate warmer and open cold medicine packaging.

After discovering the lab, the officer immediately left the home out of fear of an explosion and contamination.

The Indiana State Police Clandestine Lab Team was notified to come process the materials.

Through further investigation officers found that Henderson had purchased 92,400 milligrams of pseudoephedrine in 34 separate purchases that took place between March 2011 and December 2012.

Another resident of the home was found to have made 26 purchases of the same substance though December 2010 and November 2012.

Pseudoephedrine is an over-the-counter decongestant used to treat a common cold, but can also be used in the manufacture of methamphetamine. The purchase of the medication is tracked through the Indiana Methamphetamine Investigation System.

After his arrest, Henderson was charged in Floyd County Superior Court No. 3 with possession of chemical reagents or precursors with intent to manufacture a controlled substance, a class D felony; resisting law enforcement, a class A misdemeanor; and visiting a common nuisance, a class B misdemeanor.

OUTSTANDING WARRANT

An outstanding warrant had been issued for Henderson’s arrest Jan. 16., according to court documents.

He had plead guilty to neglect of a dependent, a class D felony, in September 2012. Through the plea, another charge of D felony drug possession (Alprazolam) was dismissed.

He was sentenced to one and one-half years in the Indiana Department of Correction, which was suspended to a probation term.

The two charges stem from a March 2011 incident where deputies with the Clark County Sheriff’s Office responded to a home in Memphis were Henderson was found unresponsive from an apparent overdose. Clark County EMS also responded to the home and took Henderson to St. Catherine’s Hospital for medical treatment.

At the time of the overdose, Henderson was supposed to be caring for his girlfriend’s 4-year-old son, according to statements made to deputies.

According to the police report, the child was unable to wake Henderson, and knew to call his mother for help.

After Henderson was taken to the hospital, deputies were informed by the nursing staff that a plastic bag containing eight yellow pills were found in his pants pocket.

The pills were later identified as Alprazolam, a Schedule 4 controlled substance.