News and Tribune

September 6, 2013

New Albany to spray for mosquitoes on Monday

Fogger unit being deployed to combat West Nile

By DANIEL SUDDEATH
daniel.suddeath@newsandtribune.com

NEW ALBANY — New Albany will deploy a portable mosquito abatement unit on Monday to attempt to combat the spreading of the West Nile virus.

Last week, the Floyd County Health Department confirmed that a human case of the virus was identified, and that three mosquito traps set in the county yielded positive results for West Nile.

New Albany owns a portable unit that can be placed in the back of a truck that disperses a chemical substance to kill mosquitoes through a fogger known as a Duet.

According to the city, the Duet is approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to limit mosquito populations.

The city will spray from the Ohio River west to Interstate 64, north to Interstate 265 and east to Silver Creek.

According to a news release issued Friday by the city, New Albany will work with the Floyd County Health Department to treat specific areas.

The application period will run from dusk to midnight.

“I am pleased that the City of New Albany has this type of resource to combat the threat of West Nile virus,” Mayor Jeff Gahan stated in the release.

“Most other communities don’t have this type of resource or equipment available to protect their citizens.”

Through an employee with the health department, Floyd County Health Officer Dr. Tom Harris declined to comment to the News and Tribune on the confirmed West Nile cases, the areas they were located in and Monday’s treatment program.

The Clark County Health Department also confirmed last month that mosquitoes in the county had tested positive for West Nile.

Most people infected by the virus don’t have symptoms, but about 20 percent will develop a flu-like illness with fever, muscle aches, chills, headache, nausea and occasionally rash.

Bee keepers are advised to cover their hives on Monday, as the fogger spray can be dangerous to the insects.