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March 24, 2014

CUMMINS: How the universe began

— Everything has a beginning and an end, except politics, which was the first thing created during the Big Bang, but it has no end. We know that making as much money as you can between your beginning and ending is what we do. Imagine an existence without credit cards, which give purpose to our lives. But shouldn’t we delve deeper than that, to our roots at the very beginning when life formed in various and bizarre designs? Compare the happiness of humans to monkeys. One banana at a time is enough.   

Right after the beginning, man began using his brain. It took billions of years, but he eventually discovered technology and the key to enlightenment, which is the smartphone. Man now has the capacity to be instantaneously updated on everything, including cataclysmic events that ripple across space and time in the form of gravitational waves.

Astrophysicists recently detected the earliest signals of creation that goes back to the birth of the universe about 14 billion years ago. These signals support the big bang theory of how the cosmos was formed. If it makes more sense to you that God did it in six days, 6,000 years ago, then read no further, but you’re risking your chance of an afterlife. The six-day theory does make God more human like. Imagine if you created the cosmos in six exhausting days wouldn’t you need a day of rest on the seventh?

The science community is never satisfied. They’re now trying to go all the way back to the big void at the beginning of time. But how can you make something out of nothing? You can’t create a politician if you’re working in a void. And how do you create love without a measurable substance to build on? Love is like a black hole, get too close and it will devour you. Science should study the human elements; greed, envy, hate, violence, love, peace and good will. Won’t touch the real mysteries, will they?

As I understand it from the scientific point of view, there was zilch, nothing in the beginning, except maybe one lonely, little atom waiting patiently to crawl out of a churning sea. But how did an atom create itself? Forget this part; we can’t know everything just yet. It’s a mystery for philosophers to ponder and for liberal governments to provide large grants for developing a super-duper computer, nearly powerful as God’s work on the seventh day.

In 1919, eclipse observations proved Albert Einstein’s theory that gravity bends light, was one of the key implications of his theory of gravity known as general relativity. There is a second theory of relativity. It says that man’s mind will bend all out of shape with or without gravitational forces. A team of astrophysicists recently took a huge telescope, the Bicep2, to the South Pole where the air is pure and still. When turning it on, they detected “ripples” of light from the beginning, indicating a Big Bang, which eventually evolved into you. These cosmic guys didn’t stay there long, wanting to get back to global warming, but while they were gone, the North Pole had dipped down below the Mason-Dixon line.

In seventh-grade, science-lab terms, this is what happened at the beginning. In a split second after the Big Bang, the universe was smaller than a pinhead. Cosmologists posited an event called “inflation,” which caused space to expand violently, and almost instantaneously, by roughly 100 trillion times, according to Daniel Baumann from the University of Cambridge. You evolved from a substance no bigger than a pinhead, and you believe this stuff? And you believe these cosmic guys (remember it’s 80 below at the South Pole) saw primordial gravitational waves, which created rippling light waves 13.5 billion years ago? With Methuselah’s help, it took Noah only 400 years to build and load the ark.

Science workers are working themselves out of a job. Only three major cosmic mysteries remain: dark energy, which may be speeding up the universe’s expansion, dark matter that holds the galaxies together and extraterrestrial life, which may be intelligent, or like it is here.

What can we learn from this exciting discovery? Not that much, but perhaps the fact space and time are warped and give off a ripple effect, has implications for living your life. The ripple effect determined the course of mine — gravitation, a big bang marriage, inflation, expansion, and now my light waves are on the blink.

— Contact Terry Cummins at TLCTLC@AOL.com

 



 



 

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