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March 6, 2013

NEWS AND TRIBUNE LETTERS — For March 6

(Continued)

It was on land that had been seized by the federal government in Jeffersonville that was later commissioned on Feb. 21, 1864, as a new general hospital. It was one of these hospital buildings that the Quartermaster Depot department first made shirts and trousers for the Union Army. 

Later that year, on July 18, 1864, nine other divisions of the Quartermaster Depot were assigned different class of supplies to each. The Seventh Division was charged with the procurement, storage and issue of vehicles and harness, hardware, etc., for the period of the Civil War.

Later, the supply demands of World War I threw an enormous load on the then half-century-old depot. That Jeffersonville met the challenge was indicated in the fact that more than 200 new buildings were erected; a pumping station, electric light plant, sewage and heating systems enlarged with two modern fire departments.

Since the declaration of war followed that fateful day of Dec. 7, 1941, the depot had added new equipment, remodeled many of its structures and added a new administration building, No. 66, engineering building, No. 41, a cafeteria and other permanent warehouses for that time. Of the 74 classes of supplies listed in the quartermaster supplement to the federal standard stock catalogue, the depot was charged with the procurement or manufacture of 11, with an estimated 27,000 total number of articles.

Brig. Gen. Guy Rowe, born Feb. 25, 1886 was assigned to the depot July 1, 1920. The depot on Nov. 23, 1942, was presented the coveted Army Navy “E” award, with the addition of two stars soon after. On March 27, 1943, the Treasury Department awarded the depot a minuteman flag for its employees’ war bond deductions.

We are proud of our city and its services to our country through the Jeffersonville Quartermaster Depot. This is a time of reflection on our city for the 149 years since the depot’s inception and the Jeffersonvillians who paved the path that has so enriched our fair city today.

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