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August 19, 2013

HOWEY: A bipartisan push toward U.S. tax reform

(Continued)

INDIANAPOLIS —

Pew observed: Surprisingly, relatively few people — just 11 percent — said their biggest complaint was the large amount they paid in taxes. Even among those with family incomes of $100,000 or more, only 17 percent said they were most bothered by how much they had to pay. Rather, most people (57 percent) were bothered by what they saw as the system’s basic unfairness — “the feeling that some wealthy people get away with not paying their fair share.” Only about half as many — 28 percent — pointed to the tax system’s complexity.

The danger to this process is when a specific set of reforms is established, all the special interests will isolate the changes that will hit them, potentially scuttling the entire package.

Young sees a path, using upcoming debt ceiling and continuing resolution votes not to shut down the government, as some have advocated, but to use as leverage to get a deal. “People want us to get something done in Washington,” he said. “That’s what people are asking us to do.”

He called it “statesmanship.”

Carter agreed, saying that the nation needs Congress to “act less like politicians and more like statesmen.”

 

— This columnist publishes at www.howeypolitics.com. Find him on Twitter @hwypol.

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