News and Tribune

August 15, 2013

Drug sting nets three arrests in Clark County

Clark County sheriff’s department finds more than 25 pounds of marijuana

By BRADEN LAMMERS
braden.lammers@newsandtribune.com

CLARK COUNTY — An investigation that spanned from Chicago to Clark County resulted in police collecting more than 25 pounds of marijuana worth more than $125,000.

Clark County Sheriff’s officers arrested three individuals after an ongoing investigation led them to believe the suspects were trafficking marijuana from Chicago to Clark County. When they crossed into the northern limits of Clark County at around 11 p.m. Friday, Aug. 9, police pulled over two vehicles on Interstate 65 near exit 19.

“During the course of the investigation the officers were able to determine the suspects were planning to travel to Chicago to purchase several pounds of marijuana,” said Clark County Sheriff Danny Rodden at a press conference Wednesday afternoon. “Officers located more than 25 pounds of marijuana inside a vehicle, and the subsequent search of a residence later uncovered more marijuana and items commonly associated with dealing marijuana.”

All three individuals were arrested and subsequently booked into the Michael L. Becher Adult Correctional Complex.

April N. Hunter, 25, Clarksville, Joel Rodriguez, 22, Charlestown, and Juan Urieta, 22, Charlestown were all initially charged with dealing in marijuana more than 10 pounds, a class C felony and possession of marijuana more than 10 pounds, a class D felony. All three have since bonded out of jail, according to Rodden.

“This is a substantial amount of marijuana,” Rodden said. “It is a little dent in the trafficking. It is interesting that it comes from Chicago to Clark County, so we’ve identified a traffic route through this investigation. We’re hopeful that we’ll uncover some more connections with the drug trade in Clark County.”

Police did not release the full report on the bust because Rodden said the investigation is still ongoing.

The narcotics officers were able to use a lot of information, witness trafficking, identify of the vehicle and use technology that helped them track the suspects. Again, many of the details of how police were able to track the suspects was not released at this time.

“It was an intensive investigation, our guys spent a lot of time on it. With hard work and limited resources we were able to accomplish this task,” Rodden said.

He thanked Clark County Narcotics Investigators Kelly and Donovan Harrod, a father and son team, along with the Clark County Sheriff’s Department special operations, detective unit and street officers for the help in the arrests.

Rodden estimated the street value of about $125,000 to $130,000, but they won’t know for sure until the confiscated product is sent to the police lab.