News and Tribune

February 6, 2013

GCCS board OKs plan to offer contracts

Two-year deals for administratos contingent on good evaluations

By JEROD CLAPP
jerod.clapp@newsandtribune.com

JEFFERSONVILLE — Administrators in Greater Clark County Schools may be offered a two-year contract after a vote at the district’s board of trustees meeting on Tuesday.

The board passed a measure to offer administrators the contract after receiving an evaluation score of effective, starting in the 2013-2014 school year.

Superintendent Andrew Melin said the practice is common statewide, but not for Greater Clark.

“We think it’s attractive for people who make the interest in coming to our school corporation,” Melin said. “... We think it’s a great incentive for current administrators.”

Melin said administrators will need to also score an effective rating in the second year of their contract in order to retain it.

He also said there’s no financial impact with offering the contracts because pay increases would not be included in the contracts.

Tony Hall, board member, said he thought the measure was a good idea, but he didn’t think the timing was right for making a move to keep administrators while teachers may still fall under the ax if the corporation’s finances aren’t in order.

“I think were sending a bad message. We could be, in a month or two, looking at laying off teachers,” Hall said. “... I just don’t think the time is right for this. Let’s get a balanced budget and then move forward. Let’s look at the superintendent’s rollover contract, then move forward.”

The board approved the measure 5-1, with Hall opposing and board member Nancy Kraft absent.

 

Vehicle replacement

The board also voted unanimously to replace eight aging maintenance vehicles in the district’s fleet.

Melin said the vehicles — three one-ton pickups and five maintenance vehicles — are between 11 and 17 years old and have up to 136,626 miles. 

Thomas Dykiel, chief financial officer, said the funds for the vehicles would come from money on their pension bond refinancing, which he said must be used for capital projects.

Hall said he was concerned about the lack of a cost estimate included in the measure. Steve Hobgood, transportation director, said he estimated the cost of each vehicle to be between $20,000 and $25,000.

Melin said another problem administrators plan to address is creating a replacement plan for those vehicles.

“There’s not been, at least we’re not aware of, a replacement schedule for vehicles,” Melin said. “We believe we need to produce that. What we’re doing is triaging our current situation with these maintenance vehicles.”