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March 19, 2013

Cosmetology licensing again under scrutiny

NEW ALBANY — Resurrected concerns over license elimination for beauty professionals could affect cosmetology students at the Prosser Career Education Center and other facilities like it statewide.

Indiana Senate Bill 520 would create a committee to review state-issued professional licenses and possibly eliminate them.  A similar bill — House Bill 1006 — died in the legislature last year. Under SB 520, licenses for beauty professionals could face elimination in 2016.

Mary Taylor, cosmetology instructor at Prosser, said the bill could affect the job opportunities of her students after they leave her program.

“It’s not just a little group of cosmetologists here in Indiana, it’s all over,” Taylor said. “In order to work for Redken or Paul Mitchell or other cosmetology product sellers, you have to be licensed.”

She said students who want to work in salons also would face problems if they wanted to work out of state. The hours students spend at Prosser may not be recognized for licensure across state lines if the bill passes.

And, it would eliminate her school’s status as a state-licensed cosmetology education facility. 

 

THE BILL

The eliminate, reduce and streamline employee regulation committee that SB 520 would create puts automatic expiration dates on licenses required in 13 job classifications. If kept, the committee would re-examine those licenses every five years.

After a committee review, a job’s license requirement may be eliminated unless professionals in that field successfully plead their case for that license’s relevance.

Rep. Ed Clere, R-New Albany, said the bill is one of Gov. Mike Pence’s prioritized pieces of legislation. Now passed in the Senate and moved to the House, Clere said he’s concerned about the ramifications SB 520 could have on job opportunities for professionals listed in the bill.

“I think that has the potential to cause a lot of needless uncertainty and disruption,” Clere said. “At a time when we’re trying to find ways to help stabilize employment and promote job creation, we shouldn’t be doing anything that could cause additional uncertainty or disruption in any business.”

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Erin Klein, a nationally-recognized education blogger and Tom Murray, State and District Digital Learning Policy and Advocacy Director for the Alliance for Excellent Education in Washington, D.C., speak to a group of educators at Jeffersonville High School on Monday. They were just a couple of the big-name education personalities at the second annual Greater Clark Connected Conference.

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