News and Tribune

Homepage

March 2, 2013

365 days later: Henryville residents celebrate recovery, community

HENRYVILLE — Flashing red and blue lights accompanied wailing sirens down U.S. 31 on Saturday. 

But unlike a year ago when hundreds were scrambling for any help they could get, Henryville residents were celebrating a year of recovery with a parade after the tornado that ravaged their hometown March 2, 2012.

Rachel Peacock and her family were bundled up in coats and blankets along the parade route. While waving to first responders who helped the community and catching candy, she said her family has already experienced healing from the destruction.

“We’ve been able to get everybody together and move forward,” Peacock said. “It just takes one day at a time. We’ve lost some memories, pictures and stuff, but everybody is still here.”

She said some of her family members lost their homes in the path of the EF-4 tornado — which was estimated to run 13 miles long and a half-mile wide. 

Lindsey Nierman also was keeping her family warm during the snowy celebration. She said though rebuilding efforts are bringing the town back to normal, there are still obvious reminders of last year’s disaster.

“It’s still sad,” Nierman said. “You still look at the hillside and the treetops, and it still makes you want to tear up with what happened. You see slowly the rebuilding of the community. You see a little progress each day as you drive through town, but there’s still a ways to go.”

Once the parade ended, residents crowded into the gymnasium of Henryville High School, which was almost completely decimated by the tornado. Five months after much of Henryville Elementary and Junior/Senior High School were destroyed, students returned to their newly rebuilt school.

As the tornado tore through the school, students piled into classrooms with teachers and the office of the elementary Principal Glenn Riggs.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
04_19_park_bench_web.jpg

Members of the Jeffersonville Arts Movement began construction in the Port Fulton neighborhood, Friday, to create an "S" curve bench, using old tires filled with dirt as the foundation. The project, divided into two phases, will use wine bottles and other sustainable materials to cover the foundation and should be completed by the end of next weekend, weather permitting.

LATEST NEWS POSTS
SOUTHERN INDIANA SPORTS

LOCAL OPINIONS
LOCAL FEATURES
EVENTS CALENDAR
e-EDITION
Thunder Over Louisville slideshow


Click on any image above to purchase these photos and more.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS
SEASONAL CONTENT
Rauch Foundation's 2014 Imagine Awards
Facebook
Must Read
Twitter Updates
AP VIDEO
Raw: More Than 100,000 Gather for Easter Sunday Raw: Greeks Celebrate Easter With "Rocket War" Police Question Captain, Crew on Ferry Disaster Raw: Orthodox Christians Observe Easter Rite Ceremony Marks 19th Anniversary of OKC Bombing Raw: Four French Journalists Freed From Syria Raw: Massive 7.2 Earthquake Rocks Mexico Captain of Sunken SKorean Ferry Arrested Raw: Fire Destroys 3 N.J. Beachfront Homes Raw: Pope Presides Over Good Friday Mass Raw: Space X Launches to Space Station Superheroes Descend on Capitol Mall Man Charged in Kansas City Highway Shootings Obama Awards Navy Football Trophy Anti-semitic Leaflets Posted in Eastern Ukraine Raw: Magnitude-7.2 Earthquake Shakes Mexico City Ceremony at MIT Remembers One of Boston's Finest Raw: Students Hurt in Colo. School Bus Crash Deadly Avalanche Sweeps Slopes of Mount Everest
MARQUEE TEXT ADS