Where is it safe?

People in America have to be asking that question after a bloody weekend in which scores of people were gunned down, 31 of them dying.

It happened in Ohio and Texas — this time. But the state name matters little. In fact, plug in whichever state name you want, because mass shootings are happening everywhere.

Many of us used to believe that if you avoided high crime areas, you’d be OK. Maybe best to take precautions, like walking with a friend, be aware of your surroundings, that kind of thing.

Now, it’s happening in our everyday places, in our schools, in our grocery stores, where we dance to music and buy fresh vegetables.

Where is it safe?

It seems we barely have time to take a breath between massacres. The reaction by officials, “I hoped this day would never come,” tells us it had occurred to them that it might.

Yet we do nothing, except apologize to families who have lost their loved ones — we’re sorry — and offer condolences and prayers. Imagine your loved ones dying in a hail of gunfire and then ask yourself if that’s enough.

You would die shielding them from the bullets, so why not live shielding them?

Urge lawmakers to:

· Ban assault-style firearms;

· Ban high-capacity magazines; and

· Require universal background checks that include relevant mental health information and prior interactions with law enforcement.

It’s not foolproof, but it’s a start. If your legislators won’t take action, elect new ones.

Where is it safe?

Someday, maybe we can answer, “Here.”

— The News and Tribune Editorial Board members are Publisher Bill Hanson, Editor Susan Duncan, and Assistant Editors Chris Morris and Jason Thomas.

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